“Colorado Giving Voice” Blog

Historic $120 million gift from The Anschutz Foundation

  • August 24, 2018
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The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has received a $120 million gift, the largest private philanthropic commitment in its history, to further elevate its stature as one of the country’s top medical destinations. The Anschutz Foundation and its founder and chair, Philip Anschutz, made the unprecedented commitment to accelerate the campus’s growth and development as one of the newest and most prominent academic medical campuses in the United States, the only one in the Rocky Mountain region, and the largest from Chicago to the West Coast. This gift brings The Anschutz Foundation’s total investment in the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus to nearly $300 million since 2000. 

Read more about CAF member The Anschutz Foundation’s gift here.

What We’re Reading: Foundations Should Fund What Nonprofits Really Need

  • August 24, 2018
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The Center for Effective Philanthropy released this blog by Anthony Richardson, an associate director at the Nord Family Foundation in Amherst, Ohio. (Nord Family Foundation is also a member of Colorado Association of Funders.)

A few days ago, a colleague and I had an amazing site visit at a regional organization where staffers — among other things — oozed excitement about their recently implemented case management system. While we were there, the staff also lamented about being uncomfortable asking funders to support expanding their information technology capacity, as some funders are only interested in funding what they think is important for organizations.

Click here to read the full article.

CAF Member News: Mile High United Way Selects 100 Strategic Investment Partners

  • August 21, 2018
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Mile High United Way recently announced that it awarded $6 million to 100 high-performing organizations in Metro Denver. “Working together, we will be changing the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in our community.”

 

Click here to read the full article.

C(3) Forum focuses on convergence and strengthening partnerships

  • July 27, 2018
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Bringing together funders and the nonprofits they support can go a long way toward encouraging ongoing dialogue, increasing understanding and building bridges for the good of our communities.

That’s why we created the annual C(3) Forum in partnership with Colorado Nonprofit Association and Community Resource Center. This week’s ninth annual, all-day convening around the theme of “convergence” brought the sector together to talk about everything from moving away from lengthy grant applications to laying the groundwork for honest feedback.

This year’s day of sharing and learning was largely inspired by the leadership cohort we formed last year with support from the Fund for Shared Insight and United Philanthropy Forum. We invited nonprofits to join with funders in thinking through what the concept of “openness” means for our sector and how it might be a means of increasing the field’s impact.

We’ve attempted to sum up some of the initial observations and approaches in this publication. We hope it will help to prompt more conversations and that both funders and nonprofits might use it to spark discussions with their staff and boards. The findings are far from scientific and are by no means meant to be prescriptive. We did try to reflect a cross-section of people from an array of organizations around the state. We’ll be doing more work to broaden and deepen dialogue on the topic and hope you will share with us what you’re seeing and learning in the months ahead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colorado Association of Funders: Exploring Openness

The Community Foundation Boulder County Seeking Proposals to Support Community Culture & Safety Collaborative Campaign

  • July 24, 2018
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The Community Foundation Boulder County has been facilitating meetings between a group of Boulder nonprofits, the Community Culture & Safety (CCS) Collaborative, who are seeking proposals from qualified fundraising professionals for campaign development and implementation services. The campaign will begin with a 3- to 5-month preliminary planning and testing period followed by a multi-year corporate capital giving campaign, with the goal of raising up to $5 Million. The planning and testing period will focus on creating solicitation messaging, draft solicitation materials, and testing the case for giving. Based on the results of this effort, the CCS Collaborative will decide whether and how to proceed with the campaign.

Click here to view the request for proposal. Proposals should be submitted by 5:00 p.m. on August 6. Please direct any questions to Maegan Vallejo at email hidden; JavaScript is required.

What We’re Reading: Three Guiding Principles for Funding and Innovating in the Social Sector

  • July 9, 2018
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“Our first Challenge asked, How might we address urgent global challenges at the intersections of peace, prosperity, and planet in radically new ways? The response was inspiring and humbling. It reflected the diversity of world-changing efforts already underway and offered a powerful reminder that there’s never been so much energy and creativity dedicated to improving life on this planet. As noted by GHR Foundation’s senior program office Mark Guy, ‘We were blown away by the number and caliber of ideas and people looking to be a part of this dialogue and movement through our work with OpenIDEO.’”

Read more on the GRANTCRAFT blog: http://www.grantcraft.org/blog/three-guiding-principles-for-funding-and-innovating-in-the-social-sector

Aspen Valley Community Foundation’s Statement about the Lake Christine Fire

  • July 6, 2018
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Dear community supporters,

The current fire in Basalt and El Jebel has devastated us with the speed and ferocity with which it has wreaked havoc across our neighborhoods and towns. Aspen Community Foundation, with its headquarters and several employees residing in Basalt, is heartbroken yet thankful that the destruction has not claimed any lives. As an organization committed to serving the Aspen to Parachute region since 1980, we are called to action to help those on the front lines and those impacted by the disaster. We can and should do our part on behalf of the immediate response efforts and to address the long-term recovery needs of this local calamity.

Aspen Community Foundation has activated its Community to Community Disaster Relief Fund to channel needed resources to respond to immediate and long-term needs of disaster victims, their families and impacted communities. Monies from this fund are disbursed directly to organizations and entities with the capability to affect the greatest need among individuals impacted by a disaster.

Click here to read the full statement, including ways to help.

Resources and Webinar: Family Separation at the Border

  • June 21, 2018
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David Biemesderfer, President & CEO, at United Philanthropy Forum talks about the intersection of philanthropy and recent policy decisions at the border: “United Philanthropy Forum envisions a courageous philanthropic sector that catalyzes a just and equitable society where all can participate and prosper. What is happening right now on the border is not just and not equitable.”

Click here to read the full article.

On June 27, there will be a webinar for Funders interested in the family separation policy, hosted by  hosted by Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees.

Click here to register and learn more. Register by COB on June 26, 2018.

Members News: Colorado Creative Industries Announces 2018 Governor’s Creative Leadership Awards

  • June 13, 2018
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Colorado Creative Industries (CCI) today announced that Rodney Wood of Trinidad, Wayne A. Gilbert of Denver, and Armando Silva of Greeley were selected to receive the 2018 Governor’s Creative Leadership Awards. Click here to read the full article.

Key Takeaways from CAF’s ‘Countdown to Census 2020: What’s at Stake for Philanthropy and Colorado’

  • May 16, 2018
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On May 14, Colorado Association of Funders convened local funders to discuss the upcoming census and philanthropy’s role in promoting a fair and accurate count. Four speakers shared what’s at stake nationally and in Colorado–touching on implications for both rural and urban areas—and offered resources and suggestions for attendees looking to get involved.

The census determines apportionment and redistricting for congress, state legislatures, city councils, and school boards; and over $800 billion in federal aid flows to states and localities based on census-derived data. “You know what you know and do what you do because of the census,” said Terri Ann Lowenthal, a consultant for the Funders Census Initiative. “That’s why you should care that the Census Bureau gets it right.”

Lowenthal noted the census doesn’t count all population groups equally well. “Hard to count groups” include:

People of color (especially men, ages 18−49)
American Indians on reservations
Low income households (renters), urban & rural
Young children (ages 0−4), especially Black & Latino kids
Limited English Proficiency and foreign-born households
Single, female-headed households
Frequent movers (including military families and young adults)

Lowenthal listed factors such as insufficient and delayed annual funding, canceled tests and scaled-back dry runs, cyber-security threats, and untested questions, all of which put a fair and accurate 2020 census at risk.

Patrick Potyondy is a Legislative Policy Specialist at the National Conference of State Legislatures, which provides non-partisan research and analysis to legislators and legislative staff. Potyondy provided additional figures to demonstrate the financial implications of an undercount. In financial year 2015, a 1% undercount from the 2010 Census resulted in $63 million in lost funds to five Federal Medical Assistance Percentage programs (Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, Title IV-E Foster Care, Title IV-E Adoption Assistance, and the Child Care and Development Fund). That’s at least $1,262 in lost funding per person.

Potyondy offered links to maps and reports with additional data and information:

Counting for Dollars 2020: The Role of the Decennial Census in the Geographic Distribution of Federal Funders (Andrew Reamer – The George Washington University of Public Policy)
The Census Bureau Response Outreach Mapper (ROAM)
Colorado’s State Data Center Program information

As the executive director of Together We Count, Rosemary Rodriguez forecasts participatory challenges for the 2020 census to make recommendations to stakeholders.  Rodriguez commented on the climate of fear produced by the addition of the citizenship question, noting the Census Bureau’s own panel of experts recommended against including it. She identified where hard to count groups are located in Colorado, based on 2014 Census Track Data.

“Without education, without outreach, and without thoughtful consideration, we’re going to miss a huge percentage of population,” Rodriguez said. She also noted that access to broadband will be an issue, since for the first time, the census will be primarily internet-based.

To conclude the program, Maggie Osborn, Senior Vice President & Chief Strategy Officer at United Philanthropy Forum, shared resources and strategies funders in other states are using. Funders can:

Join FCCP’s Funders Census Initiative (FCI)
Spread the word – talk to funder colleagues and grantees about the census to raise awareness
Provide money and training for grantees who are trusted partners in their communities to be a voice and a hub for census efforts
Consider pooled funding for joint training and communications

Investing in the census is “smart money,” said Osborn. By promoting an accurate census count, philanthropy can help ensure a fair distribution of federal funds. She reminded attendees of the statistic Potyondy shared. “Do you have $1,200 to make up for every miscount?” she asked.