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Rose Community Foundation challenges community to “Innovate for Good”

  • January 6, 2015
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Here’s the challenge: What new and innovative idea would you bring to life to make the Greater Denver community a better place to live?

You have a month to submit your best pitch here.

Rose Community Foundation will award a total of $250,000 for up to 10 new and innovative ideas. Spread the word. Or enter yourself. Almost anyone can get involved – “artists, engineers, nonprofits, neighborhood associations, teenagers, retirees – you name it,” according to the challenge launched this month.

Stay tuned for the results, which will be announced in June as the community foundation celebrates its 20th anniversary.

 

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Blueprint 2015

Shout out to Stanford Fellow Lucy Bernholz for keynoting our 2014 annual meeting. Her observations and musings and insights on the Digital Civil Society sparked lively conversation.

We’re getting ready to read her annual industry forecast to see what the next 12 months have in store for the sector. Click here to check her predictions for 2015.

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Colorado joins other community foundations at White House in marking 100 years

  • December 4, 2014
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The White House organized and hosted a convening on Dec. 2 to recognize the 100th anniversary of community foundations.

We were joined by  Josie Heath, CEO of The Community Foundation Serving Boulder County and Sheila Bugdanowitz, CEO of Rose Community Foundation as well as other community foundation leaders and regional association leaders from around the country. The day served as an opportunity to reflect on the centennial accomplishments and the future promise of what has been called “a uniquely American innovation.”

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“Stories worth telling” — A new resource from foundation with storied past of its own

  • October 6, 2014
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I’ve been fortunate to begin getting to know Julie Rogers, who retired earlier this year from the Meyer Foundation in Washington, D.C. After spending 28 years at the helm of the foundation, Rogers has decided to put down roots here in Colorado.

One of the legacies Roger’s left to the D.C. region was her leadership in creating our colleague organization there, the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers.  She’s also been an active proponent of the nationwide Forum Network, which is made up of 34 regional associations of grantmakers with more than 5,500 participating organizations, making it the largest network in American philanthropy.

Like many foundations, Meyer has a story behind it that goes beyond the source of its wealth – in this case, investment banking. According to the foundation’s website, Eugene Meyer served under seven U.S. presidents and held positions ranging from head of the War Finance Corp., to chairman of the Federal Reserve to founding president of the World Bank. His storied past includes the 1933 purchase of the Washington Post, where he served as publisher and chairmen until his death 26 years later. Agnes Ernst Meyer, his wife, was an accomplished investigative journalist, literary translator, author and activist.

But the stories the foundation perhaps cares about most are those waiting to be told by the many nonprofits it supports. Rogers shared with me this just released publication on storytelling. With support from Meyer, it was produced by  Georgetown University’s Center for Social Impact Communication.

The “Stories Worth Telling” project follows the old newspaper editor’s adage of “show me, don’t tell me” by providing examples of compelling stories that have actually worked for nonprofits trying to increase fundraising and bolster outreach efforts.

The project was intended to benefit Meyer Foundation’s grantees. But it’s available for any nonprofit looking to turn its stories into great ones.

 

 

 

 

#Philanthropy: What I did on my summer advocacy ‘staycation’

  • August 7, 2014
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Joe Ignat, Nord Family Foundation, Sheila Bugdanowitz, Rose Community Foundation and Joanne Kelley, Colorado Association of Funders catch up with Congresswoman Diana DeGette in her Denver office on Aug. 7, 2014

Tucked away in a brick office building next to the newest Trader Joe’s in town, the senior member of Colorado’s congressional delegation meets with visitors in a conference room distinguished by plaques and framed mementos from nonprofits and others recognizing her service over the years.

In the nation’s capital, the state’s only current female member of Congress has a spacious office with a coveted view from her desk window that extends down the mall to the iconic Washington Monument.

When it comes to getting Rep. Diana DeGette’s undivided time and attention, however, the home turf trumps all that.

We sat down with her this week to talk about Colorado philanthropy and how it’s making a difference in her district. We asked for her support in ensuring Congress preserves the full value of the charitable deduction when it considers tax reform in the coming year.

We also heard about her work as a member of the far-reaching Energy and Commerce Committee, as well as her leadership on a new initiative called 21st Century Cures. (Stay tuned for information on a Sept. 3, 2014, roundtable DeGette and her staff are planning on the topic in Denver before she heads back to Washington.)

In our more than half-hour meeting, there were no buzzing sounds beckoning her to floor votes, or schedulers popping their heads through the door to signal the next meeting should have started already. There were no airplane flights involved, hotel bills to pay or taxis to catch. Parking was free. And we had enough time for genuine conversation.

Turns out “recess” might be a good idea after all?

 

 

New giving data strikes optimistic note

2013_giving_usa_book_cover_imageIndividual donors continue to power gains in charitable giving, with overall contributions approaching their pre-recession high, according to annual Giving USA data released this week.

“While this has been a particularly slow recovery, many charities are beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel,” said L. Gregg Carlson, chair of Giving USA Foundation, which publishes the report.” Donors are increasingly more comfortable giving to the causes they care about and at a level in keeping with the impact they would like to make.”

The report showed an increase of $9.69 billion by individuals in 2013. Giving by foundations rose an estimated 5.7 percent, the third consecutive annual increase.

In all,  U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations and bequests combined to contribute more than $335 billion, up 4.4 percent, to charitable organizations last year. 

Read more.

 

 

Report: Foundations key source of stability during challenging economies

  • June 9, 2014
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The Foundation Center has released a preview of its forthcoming report estimating overall U.S. foundation giving set a new record of almost $55 billion in 2013, even after adjusting for inflation. The forecast predicts foundation giving will continue to grow “a few points ahead of inflation” in 2014.

The creation of 11,000 new foundations – some of them large – since 2008 helped boost the overall giving, according to the preview of the “Key Facts” report.

The Foundation Center notes overall U.S. foundation assets fell by 17 percent in the 2008 market decline. But foundation giving dropped by only 2 percent the following year. That’s because some foundations held giving steady (or reduced their giving by far less than the decline in their assets) by increasing their annual payout rates.  “The takeaway: foundations are an important source of stability during challenging and volatile economic times.”

The full report will be available in the fall.

From the government? Here to help

We weren’t sure what to expect when Secretary of State Scott Gessler gathered together a group of leaders focused on strengthening the nonprofit community in Colorado.

Gessler, whose office oversees Colorado’s nonprofit sector, called the August 2012 meeting to find out what nonprofits needed most. We spent several hours at the Tivoli Center brainstorming issues with our partners from the Colorado Nonprofit Association, Colorado Nonprofit Development Center, Community Resource Center, Metro Volunteers and other organizations from throughout the state. Gessler initially met with foundation leaders to ask the same question: What’s the biggest issue nonprofits face?

The answer seemed like an obvious one (funding), but it wasn’t. Over and over, nonprofits said that building a strong and effective board of directors continued to rank highest among their biggest challenges.

The Secretary of State’s office and a group of volunteers from various nonprofits set out to find a solution that could help address the issue. They came up with a five-part online learning series focused on training nonprofit board members.

With the final module just completed, the entire series is now available to the public, for free. It’s easy to use, too. So far, 5,400 unique visitors have checked it out. You can find it here.

The Colorado Trust embarks on new ‘community-based’ grantmaking approach

  • May 30, 2014
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Scott Downes, Senior Program Officer, The Colorado Trust

In a blog post published on The Colorado Trust’s Community Connections blog, Scott Downes describes the foundation’s new community-based participatory grantmaking strategy.

“This is not about . . . generating ideas to impose on communities, but rather finding ways to help local groups and individuals develop, support and sustain solutions,” writes Downes, a senior program officer at The Colorado Trust, a foundation focused on achieving health equity. “Solutions to long-enduring, seemingly intractable challenges. It’s about creating real change – of, by and with communities.”

Read more.

 

Join colleagues for webinar on philanthropy’s role in advancing early childhood education

  • May 29, 2014
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The Colorado Association of Funders is part of “PolicyWorks for Philanthropy.” It’s a nationwide initiative to strengthen the capacity of regional associations of grantmakers and their members to take an active role  in advocacy and policy matters.

Join colleagues from across the country on a webinar to discuss the most recent trends in how philanthropy is working with state policymakers to encourage early childhood education. You’ll also hear about how regional associations of grantmakers are working with their members to address this issue. Presenter: Sara Slaughter, Robert R. McCormick Foundation.

When: Mon., June 16, 1:00 p.m. to 2 p.m. mountain time.

Register online by Friday, June 13.

Please note: This webinar is open to members and staff of CAF and other regional associations of grantmakers.